Your guide to sustainable horsekeeping

The Green Horse section provides practical information on managing environmentally sustainable horse properties, readers stories and tips, as well as advice and articles from equestrian experts in their fields.

October/November 2018
Vol 40 No 3

In this issue of The Green Horse you will find the following articles:

Information Exchange -
BUSHFIRES- prepare for year-round bushfires.


YOUR PLACE - property design
This south-of-Perth property has been thoughtfully designed to create a haven for horses that also fits in with owners Soren and Sabine’s busy lifestyle.

PROTECT YOUR TREE'S ROOT SYSTEM
part 3
by Rebecca Cassells
To help your trees to thrive you can establish a Tree Protection Zone around the root system, which should exclude the development of driveways, buildings, concrete wash bays etc., and be fenced to prevent horses from compacting the soil.


DEEDS, STEEDS AND WEEDS
DUNG BEETLES are worth more than a billion dollars tothe Australian economy each year.

THE RIGHT TOOLS FOR WEEDS
by Mark Brown
For the majority of small land holders, weed management, general pest maintenance and even fertilisation is something that can often be self-managed with the right tools and someone pointing you in the right direction.

I LOVE A SUNBURNT COUNTRY BUT...
by Catherine Bird
With many of the horse areas of Australia suffering from no rain and surrounded by dust, herbs can help support your horse by enabling it to cope with the environment this coming season.



WIN A YEAR'S SUBSCRIPTION...
share your equine related recycling ideas or property management tips and each issue one reader will win.

Send ideas to -
The Green Horse Support <greenhorse@hoofbeats.com.au>

 

 



 






 


 


Sugardine is a paste made from sugar and iodine that has been used by horsemen through the ages to reduce the possibility of infection or inflammation, and speed healing.

The mixture can be applied to the hooves or to the skin, however a test should always be done prior to application to ensure the horse does not react to the mixture.

For thousands of years people survived without the use of antibiotics, with many early treatments involving honey and herbs. Folklore credits farriers with the ‘secret recipe’ behind sugardine, which they used to treat hoof abscesses, thrush, sole bruising or damage, and skin problems ranging from rain rot to burns

WHY IT WORKS

Folklore may have made sugardine a household word but science explains why it works. Sugar can help restore a proper pH balance in tissue, and has antibacterial properties. In 1981 the results of a five-year study on sugardine were published in Southern Medical Journal: “The use of sugardine seems to accelerate granulation tissue and epithelial tissue production, thereby covering wounds, burns or ulcers with skin.”

Researchers noted how wounds treated with sugardine responded differently from those treated with antibiotics.

“Unlike (wounds) treated with antibiotics, sugardine-treated wounds clean up rapidly; sugardine reduces oedema, nourishes surface cells and has no fetid odour. We also found it effective on coronary band lacerations, burns, and thrush.”

TO MAKE:

Start by quarter filling an old cup with sugar. Add the 10% iodine (or betadine) slowly, stirring as you pour. Keep adding the iodine until you get the sugar to a peanut butter consistency.

Check with your health professional before using and be careful with sensitive skinned horses - as some may react to the iodine since it is a counterirritant and may cause some scruffing if it comes in contact with the skin.

 

 


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